In 1 Samuel 18 Saul begins his hot jealousy of David as he sees the Spirit of God blessing all that David does. The king is also struggling with he fact that everyone loves David including the people, his own son Jonathan, his own daughter Michal, God loved him and was blessing him, and even Saul himself couldn’t help but love David. Saul begins to plot assassination attempts on Davids life including killing David himself, sending David out to war, and demanding a high bride price for his daughter which could have killed David. In all of this I saw an interesting parallel that maybe you have seen before yourself.

Does this sound familiar to you at all? Can you think of someone who said these types of things to David with such innocence?
“And David said to Saul, “Who am I, and who are my relatives, my father’s clan in Israel, that I should be son-in-law to the king?””(1 Samuel 18:18)
“And David said, “Does it seem to you a little thing to become the king’s son-in-law, since I am a poor man and have no reputation?”” (1 Samuel 18:23)

For some reason that seems a lot like how Uriah responded to David after David had committed adultery with Bathsheba.
“Uriah said to David, “The ark and Israel and Judah dwell in booths, and my lord Joab and the servants of my lord are camping in the open field. Shall I then go to my house, to eat and to drink and to lie with my wife? As you live, and as your soul lives, I will not do this thing.” (2 Samuel 11:11)

Guess who David sounds like in the case of Uriah? He sounds a lot like Saul in his response to Uriah.
“Then Saul said to David, “Here is my elder daughter Merab. I will give her to you for a wife. Only be valiant for me and fight the Lord’s battles.” For Saul thought, “Let not my hand be against him, but let the hand of the Philistines be against him.” (1 Samuel 18:17)

“And David invited him, and he ate in his presence and drank, so that he made him drunk. And in the evening he went out to lie on his couch with the servants of his lord, but he did not go down to his house. In the morning David wrote a letter to Joab and sent it by the hand of Uriah. In the letter he wrote, “Set Uriah in the forefront of the hardest fighting, and then draw back from him, that he may be struck down, and die.” (2 Samuel 11:13-15)

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